Life is not a straight road, it’s Zigzag [Missoni cardigan – McCall’s 6844].

I have a thing for the Italian fashion house Missoni, for their beautiful textiles, prints and fabrics. I made a baby cape with a Missoni for Target cotton blanket before, but I was still thirsty for more. When I saw some Missoni knit fabric in Rome on my honeymoon, I couldn’t help myself and bought some! And when I saw McCall’s 6844 envelope, I knew I’ve found the perfect pattern for it.

  • Pattern: McCall’s 6844, View C, rated ‘Easy’, sized for ‘Petite’.
  • Size made:  ‘Y’ (Xsm – med included), I made size Xs.
  • Pattern pieces: 6 for view C
  • Fabric used: Wool blend [40% wool, 30% polyester, 30% acrylic], 140cm width, 1.5m long, made in Italy, bought in Rome on my honeymoon
  • New Techniques used: First serious pattern matching attempt; First time using knit (tricot) interfacing.
  • Modifications: I reduced the peplum length and corresponding neckband by 6cm due to not enough fabric for pattern matching.

 

Missoni is famous for their chevron weave. I chose the blue/pink colourway.

 

I made View C, which has a mullet peplum. Pic from here.

 

The pattern is rated ‘Easy’ and sized for Petite. However, the only difference is the sleeve and bodice lengths for petite – which is no different to using the shortening/lengthening line. The shoulders and bust areas are the same for regular/petite.

 

I’m considered petite (5’0″) but when I put the pattern against my body in the mirror, the waistline point falls on my natural waistline, so I didn’t do the petite adjustment for the bodice. I did it for the sleeves (and later found out I didn’t have to, either).

 

I had just enough fabric for the pattern (1.5m) IF I didn’t have to pattern match. Since I had to, I didn’t have enough and needed to reduce the peplum and neckband length (as marked in the pic).

 

The reduced peplum sewn together.

 

Bodice and peplum attached. In the end, I STILL didn’t have enough fabric to make the two front peplum prints symmetrical.

 

The fabric has a loose weave, and I decided to hand sew the sleeve and peplum hems to maintain tension and make sure it doesn’t fray. All other seams were done on the overlocker.

 

The neckband with interfaced facing, ready to be joined to the bodice.

 

The neckband will be folded back lengthwise when worn, to create some kind of ‘lapel’ for the cardigan.

 

Sleeves attached as well. I did the petite adjustment (shortened) for the sleeves, and in the end it was too short for me. So instead of a 3cm hem (included in pattern), I sewed 1.5cm. In effect, I didn’t need to do any petite adjustments. Which is strange given that I AM petite. As for the print matching, I tried to match the zigzags across the neckband, bodice AND the sleeves – ideally I needed an extra 50cm of fabric to achieve it if I didn’t reduce the peplum.

 

ZigZag all the way!

 

Although I’ve reduced the peplum length by 6cm, I think it’s still relatively in proportion, especially because I’m so short.

 

The pattern says “For moderate stretch knits only’. I guess the sturdier the knit, the more pronounced the peplum. I’d say mine is a medium-fine loose weave knit fabric.

 

I actually bought another Missoni chevron fabric in the red/black colourway. Dreaming about what to make with that…

Split up, Wrap up [McCall’s 7185].

I’ve wanted to make this dress as soon as I saw the pattern envelope. A fitted wrap dress with a split, and rolled up sleeves. I could never find something similar in shops that fit my 5’0″ stature, so why not try to make one? Not being experienced with pattern fitting and grading, I think I got lucky this time.

  • Pattern: McCall’s 7185, View B, with separate pieces for cups A/B, C and D.
  • Size made:  US 6-14 included, I made size 6 in cup A/B.
  • Pattern pieces: 11 for view B (without pockets)
  • Fabric used: Cotton Sateen [97% cotton, 3% spandex],  127cm width, 3m long, made in China, bought from Spotlight
  • New Techniques used: First time trying a true wrap design; Making buttonholes; Sleeve tabs.
  • Modifications: Eliminated pockets.
McCall’s 7185. The description on the pattern envelope is “Wrap dress have fitted bodice, waist band, skirt variations, stitched hem, snap and hook & eye closure.” I made View B, which is what the model is wearing.

 

View B: “Rolled, below elbow sleeves with button tab. Mock bands, semi-fitted skirt, pockets. Separate pattern pieces are included for cup sizes A/B, C, D.”
Photo from here.

 

Eleven pattern pieces when the pocket is eliminated. I would have made the pocket if my fabric was plain, but with the print I thought it would be too cluttered.

 

According to the suggested sizing, I should have made 6/8/10 for B/W/H, but I cut a straight 6 knowing there is so much ease in Big 4 patterns. Above, the facing for neck and bodice is continuous in the wrap design.

 

Bodice done. It fits me without any grading. As it is a true wrap design, there is some leeway as to how tightly you overlap the pieces at the front to fit the body.

 

The two front skirt pieces are mirror images of each other, and the edges are faced. Actually, as I’ve posted on Instagram, the skirt pieces are darted, ease-stitched, interfaced, self-faced, understitched, basted, overlocked, pressed and then top-stitched…

 

Skirt done. It also fits my hips, which is surprising given the discrepancy between their suggestion and what I cut – but again, being a wrap design, it offers some window of error.

 

First time making sleeve tabs, and more importantly, BUTTONHOLES! I’ve been avoiding them for years thinking they are too difficult…my first 20+ garments had no buttons for a reason. I finally tried it on my sewing machine and it took all of 5 minutes!

 

Finished garment. This actually took about 30 hours to make. I had to go very slowly especially with top-stitching all the way around the neck, bodice and skirt edges.

 

The front flap is held by metal snaps and bar-hook closure at the waistband.

 

I tacked the roll-up sleeves in place, as I will never wear it unrolled (it doesn’t have a cuff), and I can’t be bothered rolling it every time. The buttons have a shell-iridescent base with pink and purple swirls on top.

 

Back view. Being short, I usually have to shorten the skirt piece by 10+cm. I did not alter the skirt length here, and you can see that the dress is supposed to be above-knee, on the model, but on me it is clearly below the knee.

 

 

I think I got lucky this time, making a somewhat fitted garment with reasonable results, without making any adjustments or pattern grading, while cutting a size that clearly deviates from what is suggested by the company. It was stressful every step of the way, not knowing if it would fit or not and whether the garment is wearable in the end! The most sensible thing to do is to make a muslin, but I just don’t have the motivation to do so…gotta thank my lucky stars.

 

Shades of Autumn [Burda 6919].

Mustard with hints of Burgundy, Emerald and Teal. It screams Autumn to me! This loud print is not my usual style, but I fell in love with the colours. The fabric is also buttery soft, and is perfect for mild autumns in Queensland. I made Burda 6919 with it. It is a pattern for a knit semi-fitted dress with scoop neck, shoulder holes, tucks in bodice and skirt, batwing sleeves and elasticated waist.

  • Pattern: Burda 6919, View A. Rated ‘Easy’.
  • Size made:  US 8-18 included, I made size 8
  • Pattern pieces: 5 for view A
  • Fabric used: Stretch jersey [90% polyester, 10% spandex],  148cm width, 1.5m long, made in China, bought from Spotlight
  • New Techniques used: First time trying pattern matching – I only managed the centre fronts of bodice and skirt. Side seams not matched…
  • Modifications: Shortened skirt at hem by 14cm; Encased waist elastic instead of sewing onto the seam allowance; Hand-stitched hem and dress hems.
Burda 6919.

 

Line drawings. I made View A, which is knee length (although I still had to shorten the hem by 14cm!). Pic from here.

 

Only 5 pattern pieces.

 

The pleats were interesting to cut >< even harder on knit fabric.

 

Luckily I had enough fabric (1.5m length). Normally I buy 2m to be safe.

 

Bodice done. The neck binding sticks up – it was probably too long? Or I stretched it when I sewed it? Or thread tension issue? Anyway, I actually didn’t really mind it…

 

Pleats on the skirt.

 

I hand-sewn the skirt (invisible) hem for a neater finish. Still haven’t figured out the invisible hem function on my sewing machine…

 

Completed.

 

I think the pleats got drowned in the print.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dressmaking Scrapbook Vol. 1

I have done proper scrapbooking in the past (they are on my Gallery page under ‘Scrapbooking‘), with fancy papers and embellsihments. It is a really time-consuming hobby, and also after discovering dressmaking, I’ve lost motivation for scrapbooking a bit.

However, I’ve decided to make a simple scrapbook to document my dressmaking projects. I drew them using templates from a Fashionary book (I’m not affiliated with them), and made paper envelopes to house my traced patterns. I added a swatch of fabric with metal studs.

Here is my first Dressmaking Scrapbook, Volume ONE. It documents the first 20 handmade garments I’ve completed. You can click on the link at the bottom of each pic to see the post of each item.

 

 

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

Full post here.

 

That was fun! Both the dressmaking and the scrapbooking. It’s great to combine two crafts, the process and result is always satisfying. I’ve already started Volume Two! But it will take a long while to fill up. At the moment I’m only sewing maximum one garment per month.

 

Sew, Seoul Happy [McCall’s 7243].

I like to sew Destination Dresses – when I sew something to wear on an overseas trip.  When I knew MS and I were going to Seoul in South Korea, I decided to make McCall’s 7243 in a thicker knit to wear in the still-cold Springtime there. 

  • Pattern: McCall’s 7243, View D
  • Size made:  AX5 (sizes 4-12 included). I made size 6
  • Pattern pieces: 5 for view D
  • Fabric used: Stable knit with textured ‘braids’ on right side, [83% polyester, 15% viscose, 2% spandex], 138cm width, 2m length, unknown country of origin, bought from Tessuti Fabrics
  • New Techniques used: One piece wrap collar
  • Modifications: Reduced collar width; Hand sewn hems; Refined hip fitting by trying it on, pinching and pinning.
McCall’s M7243. It has a mock wrap collar; Full, 3/4 or no sleeves and can be made as a top or dress. The fabric I used is a textured, sturdy knit.

 

I made View D, which is a long sleeved dress, and no contrast collar colour. Pic from here.

 

Five pattern pieces for View D. Originally I cut a size 6 top grading to size 10 at the hips, as in the above picture. Later on I graded it back to a 6 on the bottom as negative ease worked better with my fabric.

 

For the round wrap collar piece, I originally did the hemming by machine after pinning.

 

Constructing the collar took me a while, as it was my first time sewing a collar like this design.

 

Took a break from sewing, and came back to this – was confused for a moment. Sometimes it’s easier to do most of the sewing in one sitting, just so I keep my chain of thought.

 

Initially, this was the completed garment. I wasn’t happy with the way the collar hems sat. The fabric is too stiff for the intended draping effect at the shoulder and it stuck out. Also the hem puckered with machine stitching (I tried changing the tension, using ball needle too). Maybe a ponte would have worked better.

 

I’ve posted this on Instagram – I reduced the width of the collar, and hand-sewn the hems. (Left is before, Right is after)

 

My final version. It is a fitted dress, and probably short for average height people – for me (5’0″), it sat just above the knee without any shortening. Collar hems still not flat *sob* – probably because the fabric was thick, the shape was round, and hems folded over twice.

 

The back. I thought the back flap should sit flat as per the pattern envelope, but even in McCall’s official picture there is a wave at the back (see below), so I feel OK with that.

 

McCall’s official back view. Pic from here. (The original shoulder flap drapes nicely with a lighter knit)

 

We went to see the Gyeongbokgung Palace in Seoul. I wore my dress!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruffle Me Up [Simplicity 2497].

This dress is probably my longest-running UFO. I started it more than a year ago, traced the pattern and cut the fabric, and had not touched it since.  Up until last month when I finally decided to sew it, as it was taking up precious space in my fabric cupboard.

Simplicity 2497 is an OOP pattern (it wasn’t OOP when I bought it in Spotlight!). Given that I sew so slowly, with endless distractions/responsibilities, by the time I sew my patterns, I’m not surprised if most of them are out of print or out of fashion. Neck ruffles, if I remember correctly, were trendy a few years ago. Maybe not now, but I don’t care….On the topic of trends – I don’t follow trends much – but even if I wanted to, I’d have no hope of sewing them. By the time I finish it, trend will be over. Maybe by a few years. I bought some off-the-shoulder patterns last season ( I like the style regardless of trend), but now it’s all about the sleeves…so my attitude is, just sew whatever.

  • Pattern: Simplicity 2497, a Cynthia Rowley design, View D
  • Size made:  D5 (sizes 4-12 included). I made size 4
  • Pattern pieces: 7 for view D (after eliminating pockets)
  • Fabric used: Polyester crepe,135cm width, 3m length, bought on my Japan trip
  • New Techniques used: Sewing princess seams; Using rolled hem
  • Modifications: Raised neckline at lowest point by 5cm; Eliminated pockets; Reduced bodice sides by 5cm total; Used rolled hem instead of narrow hem for neck ruffle
Simplicity 2497. Lots of beautiful versions on the internet. I decided to use an oriental print textured crepe I bought in Japan in 2015.

 

I made View D, which has neck ruffle, side split, maxi length, and sleeveless. Pic from here.

 

Seven pattern pieces for View D (no pocket).

 

The skirt length chewed up quite a bit of fabric.

 

More than a year has lapsed between the last picture and this! Finally made up the bodice.

 

The gathered waist fits into an interfaced waist band with self-facing slip-stitched into place on the wrong side. It’s not very straight…but I think no one will notice when worn :P

 

Machine gathered, then hand-basted the neck ruffle by hand. My mannequin is so useful.

 

It took a while to get the ruffle (almost) evenly spread.

 

The back. The ruffle width is very wide/tall, and the fabric is soft, so the top portion will flop down when I wear it.

 

Done. The weight of the skirt fabric drags the waist band down. I wonder if I should have used a heavier iron-on interfacing, or made a waist stay?

 

We went to a historic, heritage mansion. It’s beautiful there.

 

I love hydrangeas. Plenty in the garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Look to the Light [Butterick 5878].

First handmade garment of the year, and it’s already February! My goal to sew more isn’t going that well…but we all start somewhere :P

The reason I chose this pattern to make was simple. I accidentally bought two of the same paper patterns during sales, so I decided I’ll try for the very first time to cut straight into the tissue paper instead of tracing. The relaxed fit reassured me that minimal adjustment or grading would be needed.

  • Pattern: Butterick 5878, I made View B
  • Size made:  A5 (sizes 6-14 included). I made size 6
  • Pattern pieces: 8 for view B (total 11 pieces in envelope)
  • Fabric used: 100% Rayon, 135cm width, 1.5m length (really should need 2m), made in Thailand, bought from Spotlight
  • Trim used: 6m (used about 4-5m in the end) scallop lace trim from Lincraft
  • New Techniques used: Making yoke facing; Elasticated sleeves
  • Modifications: Shortened skirt tiers – middle panel by 4.5cm, bottom panel by 5.5cm. Reduced sleeve length 7cm. Altered lace trim placement.
Butterick 5878. I made View B, which is the white one second from the right on the envelope picture.
Butterick 5878. I made View B, which is the white one second from the right on the envelope picture.

 

View B has mid-length sleeves, and 3 tiers on the bottom.
View B has mid-length sleeves, and 3 gathered tiers on the bottom. All of the views have bodice with front and back yokes and wrap bodice. Pic from here

 

8 pattern pieces for view B.
8 pattern pieces for view B.

 

The front and back yokes have self-facings that get slip-stitched into place.
The front and back yokes have self-facings that get slip-stitched into place.

 

Bodice constructed.
Bodice constructed.

 

Sleeves with gathers at the shoulder and elastic on the bottom.
Sleeves with gathers at the shoulder and elastic on the bottom.

 

Top half done! I used a red-and-blue scallop edge trim to match the fabric. I also decided to put them on the wrap front hems instead of along the yoke seams, which would have obscured the little gathers I painstakingly made!
Top half done! I used a red-and-blue scallop edge trim to match the fabric. I also decided to put them on the wrap front hems instead of along the yoke seams, which would have obscured the little gathers I painstakingly made! I also added a metal snap at the ‘V’ where it crosses over.

 

Bottom 2 skirt tiers. I don't like gathering...soldier on...
Bottom 2 skirt tiers. I don’t like gathering…soldier on…

 

Finished skirt portion.
Finished skirt portion.

 

Elasticated waist. The Elastic was hidden in the seam allowance.
Elasticated waist. The Elastic was hidden in the seam allowance.

 

Completed garment. Phew, totally ran out of steam somewhere in the middle. Glad it's finished.
Completed garment. Phew, totally ran out of steam somewhere in the middle. Glad it’s finished. I placed the trim only at the bottom, not between the tiers as suggested by View B. I shortened the tiers (for my height) and thus the lace would have been very close together and unflattering if I followed the original design.

 

We took a mini road trip to the sunflower fields in the countryside…

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“Keep your face toward the sunshine and shadows will fall behind you.” ~ Walt Whitman

 

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I have another project in the works…let’s see how that goes. 

 

 

‘Tis the Season to Shine [Self-drafted sequin skirt].

When should one make an impractical, shiny, sparkly piece of garment? The silly season, of course!

I made a skirt out of sequined fabric. Not the heat-bonded type, but the individually stitched on type. Which, as I find out, is my absolutely least favourite fabric to sew! I tried removing the sequins at the seam line before I sew, but ended up having a visible gap. I stitch any closer, the sequins get caught in the machine needles, and I broke 2 needles. In the end I just hand-stitched it.

  • Pattern: Self-drafted, loosely based on RTW garment
  • Size made: Custom
  • Pattern pieces: 1
  • Fabric used: Stretch sequin fabric, origin unknown, less than 1m needed, bought from Lincraft
  • New Technique used: Sewing sequin fabric (not much luck with machine)
  • Modifications: N/A

(Edit: I found more photos from my old laptop and added them here)

An RTW skirt to be used to make the pattern, and an old T-shirt to be cut up and used as skirt lining.
An RTW skirt to be used to make the pattern, and an old T-shirt to be cut up and used as skirt lining.

 

I took a RTW skirt that fits me, traced around it and added seam allowance.
I traced around the skirt and added seam allowance.

 

Just one pattern piece - I traced around a RTW skirt and added seam allowance all the way around. (The 'pattern weights' are my husband's model train tracks...)
Just one pattern piece. The front and back piece is the same, no darts as I rely on negative ease with a stretch fabric. I used my husband’s model train tracks as pattern weights :P

 

My sparkly notebook and the sequin fabric for the skirt.
My sparkly notebook and the sequin fabric for the skirt.

 

The front and back pieces cut out.
The front and back pieces cut out.

 

I made a 'lining' with an old T-shirt. I made it slightly smaller than the outer skirt by using the same pattern but sewing more seam allowance.
I made a ‘lining’ with the old T-shirt. I made it slightly smaller than the outer skirt by using the same pattern but sewing more seam allowance (the left side seam of the outer skirt has already been sewn in this pic).

 

I made such a mess with sequins falling everyyyyywhere.
I made such a mess with sequins falling everyyyyywhere.

 

Sew the side seams, made the 'waistband' by folding it in and stitching, while catching the lining - then it is done.
Sew the side seams, made the ‘waistband’ by folding it in and stitching, while catching the lining – then it is done. The hem was left raw.

 

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Christmas is fast approaching – hope everyone will have a festive, happy time spending with their loved ones during this holiday season.

 

East Meets Greece [Vogue 8898].

I’m not even going to pretend to be able to say ‘Hello’ in Greek. I still couldn’t, even after spending 2 weeks there some time ago.

In preparation for my Greece trip, I have sewn a grand total of….ONE garment to wear there. Boo. I had aimed for three, but alas, life has been crazy and busy. Oh well, one is better than none.

I had originally wanted to make a Grecian inspired dress – a white, one shouldered, fluid-y, maxi-length concoction. But the more I think about it, the more cliche it is to wear that in the country especially as a tourist. So instead I used a pattern with an asymmetrical design. I still used white as the base colour, and it was not until after I’ve finished the dress that I realised the print has an oriental feel to it. So, East meets West it is.

  • Pattern: Vogue 8898, I used elements from all views: View A length + View B shoulder tie + View C hole-in-waist design (sans sash as I used a belt)
  • Size made: Size Y (x-small to med included). I made x-small
  • Pattern pieces: 3 (I cut the pattern for sash but didn’t use it. Four pieces if include sash)
  • Fabric used: Polyester knit (92% polyester, 8% spandex), 147cm width, 1.5m length, made in China, bought from Spotlight
  • New Techniques used: Interfaced sash opening (like a buttonhole) and handsewn
  • Modifications: Moved sash opening 3cm towards midline; Moved armhole from shoulder to side seam; Shortened length 5cm at lower hem; Topstitched drape-y side seam.
Vogue 8898 and my fabric.
Vogue 8898 and my fabric.

 

I made View A length + View B shoulder tie + View C sash opening at waist combination.
I made View A length + View B shoulder tie + View C sash opening at waist combination.

 

My happiest/worst habit: eating chocolate while tracing patterns...
My best/worst habit: eating chocolate while tracing patterns. My favourite pattern weights.

 

4 pieces here including the sash. I didn't make the sash in the end as I wore a belt instead. So only 3 pieces for this dress!
Four pieces here including the sash. I didn’t make the sash in the end as I wore a belt instead. So only 3 pieces for this dress!

 

4 pieces here including the sash. I didn't make the sash in the end as I wore a belt instead. So only 3 pieces for this dress!
I even cut out the 2 pieces of fabric for the sash, but decided against sewing it because the waist needs more contrast.

 

Shoulder pleats sewn.
Shoulder pleats sewn (wrong side shown here).

 

Making the sash opening - essentially a buttonhole. I cut out a rectangular piece of iron-on interfacing as instructed, but in the future I will cut a circular piece as I feel rounded edges don't peel off the fabric as easily as sharp corners.
Making the sash opening – essentially a buttonhole. I cut out a rectangular piece of iron-on interfacing as instructed, but in the future I will cut a circular piece as I feel rounded edges don’t peel off the fabric as easily as sharp corners.

 

I wasn't feeling up to trying the buttonhole function in my sewing machine, so I did it by hand. Puckering...
I wasn’t feeling up to trying the buttonhole function in my sewing machine, so I did it by hand. Puckering…

 

The "modification" (accidental...) I made. I sewed the armhole on the sideseam. The effect is such that there is less bulk of fabric under the arm. Which is a good thing for me, as I have short arms.
The “modification” (accidental…) I made. I sewed the armhole on the sideseam. The effect is such that there is less bulk of fabric under the arm. Which is a good thing for me, as I have short arms.

 

Einstein quote: “If a cluttered desk is a sign of a cluttered mind, of what, then, is an empty desk a sign?”
Einstein quote: “If a cluttered desk is a sign of a cluttered mind, of what, then, is an empty desk a sign?”

 

Finished garment. I didn't sew the sash as I wanted the waist to be more defined. I tried a red ribbon...
Finished garment. I top-stitched the “wing” seam to add structure and definition, as my fabric is quite fluid and the fold doesn’t hold and looks like a circular tube otherwise. I didn’t sew the sash as I wanted the waist to be more defined. I tried a red ribbon…

 

...a green sash... (I am demonstrating the "optimal arm lift" here. Too bad I can't walk around like this all day, haha)
…and a green sash…but I chose a gold belt in the end for the Grecian touch.
(Here I am demonstrating the “optimal arm lift” here to highlight the asymmetrical under-arm wing . Too bad I can’t walk around like this all day, haha)

 

And where did I wear this dress? In Cape Sounion, at the Temple of Poseidon, in the Attica Peninsula in Greece. (On the left is the private beach of our hotel, and the temple is on the hill)
I wore this dress to Cape Sounion, at the Temple of Poseidon, in the Attica Peninsula in Greece. (On the left is the private beach of our hotel, and the temple is on top of the hill)

 

Vogue 8898 dress (13)

Vogue 8898 dress (14)

Vogue 8898 dress (15)

"I will just make the opening in the middle of the shoulder tie and no one will see it" - and you can CLEARLY see my shoddy handiwork there :P
“I will just make the opening in the middle of the shoulder tie and no one will see it” – and you can CLEARLY see my shoddy handiwork there. You can also see the swarm of freckles creeping up my arm – we walked in the fierce sun for hours every day, and I have gotten quite a tan after the trip too.

 

Vogue 8898 dress (17)

Vogue 8898 dress (18)
Temple of Poseidon, built circa 440BC, on Cape Sounion.

 

Vogue 8898 dress (19)

Vogue 8898 dress (20)

 

Vogue 8898 dress (21)

Vogue 8898 dress (22)
View from the cape – beautiful sunset over the Aegean Sea.

 

We also went to Athens, Delphi, Olympia, Nafplio, Mycenae, Corinth, Marathonas and Santorini in Greece. I wish I had made something to wear to each city!

You Sew, You Learn [New Look 6022].

I made a dress top! 

That just revealed where I made the error. I started out making a dress, and it ended up being a top. Title of the post was inspired by Alanis Morisette’s song “You Learn”, which has been playing in the car (and in my head) lately. Just checked and the recording was released in 1995. Eek. Time flies. 

  • Pattern: New Look 6022, View B with sash from View C
  • Size made: 6-16 included, I made size 6
  • Pattern pieces: 5 for view B + sash
  • Fabric: (a light to medium weight woven fabric with sheen – possibly polyester? Satin? Bought too many years ago to remember), 140cm width, 1.5m length, (unknown place of manufacture), bought from Lincraft
  • New Techniques Used: Cap sleeves; Single bias tape sleeve finish; Back elastic
  • Modifications: Topstitched sash; Dress made into top (“unintentional modification”)
New Look 6022. I made View B with the sash from View C.
New Look 6022.

 

Pic from here.
I made View B (cap sleeves option) with the sash from View C. The garment has no darts and no interfacing. Pic from here.

 

5 pattern pieces. There was no interfacing for this garment.
5 pattern pieces including the sash.

 

I tried pattern matching but it wasn't successful, AGAIN :(
I tried pattern matching but it wasn’t really successful, AGAIN. The side checks didn’t match up, but the design wasn’t too defined so the misalignment wasn’t too obvious (to me).

 

Back elastic. I don't think I stretched the elastic evenly over the fabric when I stitched it down.
Back elastic. I don’t think I stretched the elastic evenly over the fabric when I stitched it down.

 

I had the best intentions. I cut and sewn the dress as is/was.
I had the best intentions. I cut and sewn the dress as is/was.

 

And the back. So what went wrong?
And the back. I made the back neck opening and thread loop/button and all, but it wasn’t necessary. The scoop neck was very wide and I can just pull it over my head without undoing the button.

 

I was distracted and rushed and cut a hole in the garment. WHAT. THE. I kept yelling at myself, "omg omg omg are you stooopid??"
All was well. THEN…I was distracted and rushed and cut a hole in the garment. WHAT. THE. I kept shrieking at myself, “Omg omg omg are you stooopid?? Noooooooooooo whyyyyyyyyy”

 

After the initial shock and the calming effect of some chocolates and walking away from the project for half a day... it must go on. Sadface though. Time to do the sleeves.
After the initial shock and the calming effect of some chocolate and walking away from the project for half a day… it must go on. Sadface though. Time to do the sleeves.

 

Single fold bias tape finish for armhole.
Single fold bias tape finish for armhole. Just cotton ones bought from Spotlight.

 

I tried mending the slit but it looked terrible. So I just hacked the whole bottom portion off. I would have loved it to be a dress, but oh well, I can wear it as a top now. Bonus sash.
I tried mending the slit but it looked terrible. So I just hacked the whole bottom portion off. I would have loved it to be a dress, but oh well, I can wear it as a top now. I added topstitching to the sash, which turned out to be quite meh. Too hard to make the hem not twist. But I was verging towards not-care territory by then.

 

In the spirit of the failed purple dress, I took out my purple (RTW) skirt to go with the top, so the original purple all-over look would be preserved…somewhat.

 

New Look 6022 top (11)

New Look 6022 top (12)

New Look 6022 top (13)

New Look 6022 top (14)

New Look 6022 top (15)

 

New Look 6022 top (16)

New Look 6022 top (17)

Better be more careful next time. I was taught not to run with scissors as a kid. I learned that as an adult, even sitting down with scissors can cause problems…